Latest Media Releases

Actor Scarlett Johansson visits India & Sri Lanka; commits to helping end poverty

Actor Scarlett Johansson has joined international agency Oxfam in the fight against poverty following a life-changing trip to India and Sri Lanka. During her ten-day visit, Scarlett learned how investing in education and basic health-care are vital to saving lives and lifting millions of poor children and families out of poverty. She also met Indian women who’ve survived domestic violence and Tsunami survivors in Sri Lanka.

Oxfam flies in relief supplies to assist thousands affected by devastating floods in Mozambique

International aid agency Oxfam will fly out with 14 tonnes of water, sanitation and hygiene equipment on Thursday 15 February to help thousands of people who have been left homeless by severe flooding in Mozambique. Heavy rains and rising flood waters are forecast to continue in the region this week, which threatens to worsen the situation of up to 285,000 people living in vulnerable areas.

Climate Change? Greenhouse gases? Add to it toxic waste dumping by Australian miners

Australian, Canadian and US mining companies that persist in dumping billions of tonnes of toxic heavy metals such as mercury and lead into the rivers and oceans of some of the world’s poorest countries are causing irreversible environmental damage as well as driving human poverty. This warning by a coalition of human rights groups and mining watchdogs as mining ministers from the Asia-Pacific gather in Perth this week for a summit.

Not in anyone’s backyard

On a typically steamy day in Papua New Guinea’s capital Port Moresby, the Australian manager of one of the country’s gold mines said, ‘We don’t have a social responsibility program because we didn’t think we’d be operating more than two years.’ Ten years after mining began and with plans to expand production, the Australian-owned mine still has no intention of ending the practice of dumping more than 140,000 tonnes of toxic waste such as lead and mercury into the local river system each and every year. In fact, the company has no plans whatsoever to minimise the social and environmental impacts of its operations. Meanwhile, downstream, out of sight and out of mind, vulnerable people who rely on the river for drinking, fishing and washing as well as land cultivation find themselves at the pointy end of the senseless and selfish actions of a multibillion dollar Australian mining operation. The company however cannot plead ignorance. Neither is it oblivious to the harm it’s caused ‘ local people have complained bitterly on several occasions about the irreversible environmental and social damage caused by the mine.

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